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Below are answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about knee replacement. But these FAQs are not a substitute for medical advice from Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team. Please be sure to speak with Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team about any questions regarding your specific symptoms, diagnosis and treatment options.

Every hospital has its own procedures. While you should discuss any specific procedures they may have in place, you may expect to follow this basic routine. Arrive at the hospital at your appointment time and complete the registration and admission process. One of the nursing staff will assess your vital signs (like blood pressure and temperature) and your general health. You’ll change into a hospital gown and likely settle into a pre-surgery room. Your anesthesiologist and operating room nurse will come in to talk with you, and the team will start the IV (intravenous) line that will be used to administer fluids and medication. Your family can usually stay with you until the team wheels to the operating room where  Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team will perform your knee replacement. After the surgery, you’ll be wheeled into a recovery room where your recovery team will monitor your vital signs until you’re ready for transport to your hospital room. From there, the hospital floor nursing team will continue to monitor your vital signs and your incision site and dressing. You may be surprised how quickly you’ll be evaluated by a physical therapist. The team will get you moving with special post-op activities. You’ll also begin a diet of clear liquids or soft foods as soon as you can tolerate it.
Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team wants to make sure you’re healthy and prepared for surgery and recovery. You’ll likely need a physical checkup, routine blood work, and a urine test. If you’re over 50, or have a heart or respiratory issue, you may also need an EKG and a chest X-ray. Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team will recommend specific tests based on your specific diagnosis and medical condition.
Spinal anesthesia is the preferred method for most total knee replacement surgeries. Ask your anesthesiologist about the method recommended for you and any other concerns you have.
While age is an important factor in your health, age alone is usually not a reason to not have knee replacement surgery. Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team will be more interested in your overall health, and will consider a variety of things such as blood test results, your physical strength, bone density, diet/lifestyle, etc. to determine whether knee replacement is right for you.
Not everyone needs blood during knee replacement surgery.1 If necessary, the hospital provides blood that has been screened in compliance with universal guidelines that help ensure patient safety. In some cases, autologous blood donations, in which a patient donates their own blood to potentially be used during their surgery, can be coordinated. If done, the blood donation must be done several weeks prior to the date of surgery. Speak to Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team about your options.
Wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing. Most hospitals supply basic toiletries, non-skid socks, and a gown. You’ll want to bring an overnight bag with a few personal toiletries, like shaving supplies, a robe, and anything that will make you feel more comfortable. (Avoid bringing valuables.) And, be sure to bring a list of your current medications and any paperwork the hospital requested. If you use, or plan to use your own assistive device for walking – cane, crutches, or walker – have someone bring it to the hospital before you’re discharged (no need to bring it now).
Generally, hospitals request that you arrive four hours before your scheduled surgery time. This gives you plenty of time for the admission process, to change into your hospital gown, and to meet the anesthesiologist and nursing team who will be with you during your surgery. It also gives you time to ask questions and settle in. Talk to your hospital to see their recommended arrival time. It is typically important for patients not to eat or drink after midnight the night before surgery. But you should ask Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team for instructions about when to stop eating or drinking. Sometimes your physician may allow you to take some of your critical daily medication the morning of surgery. If this is the case, take the medication with the least amount of water necessary. Be sure to tell the admitting nurse if you’ve taken medication.
Our practice managers, who assists you before, during, and after your surgery, will schedule you to attend a pre-operative class so you and your family members learn more about what to expect and how to support you. These highly recommended classes usually rotate weekly between total knee replacement and total hip replacement. By attending class, you and Our practice managers will be better equipped to plan for your surgery and recovery experience. Contact the hospital for further details about the pre-operative class.
While age is an important factor in your health, age alone is usually not a reason to not have knee replacement surgery. Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team will be more interested in your overall health, and will consider a variety of things such as blood test results, your physical strength, bone density, diet/lifestyle, etc. to determine whether knee replacement is right for you.
As with any surgery, knee replacement surgery has serious risks which include, but are not limited to, pain, infection, bone fracture, peripheral neuropathies (nerve damage), circulatory compromise (including deep vein thrombosis (blood clots in the legs)), genitourinary disorders (including kidney failure), gastrointestinal disorders (including paralytic ileus (loss of intestinal digestive movement)), vascular disorders (including thrombus (blood clots), blood loss, or changes in blood pressure or heart rhythm), bronchopulmonary disorders (including emboli, stroke or pneumonia), heart attack, and death. Implant related risks which may lead to a revision include dislocation, loosening, fracture, nerve damage, heterotopic bone formation (abnormal bone growth in tissue), wear of the implant, metal and/or foreign body sensitivity, soft tissue imbalance, osteolysis (localized progressive bone loss), and reaction to particle debris. Knee implants may not provide the same feel or performance characteristics experienced with a normal healthy joint.
The lifetime of a knee replacement is not infinite and varies with each individual. However, with normal wear, knee replacements can potentially last for many years. At the 16-year mark, only 8% of knee replacements required a revision, with implant loosening being the main reason.1 The lifetime of any knee replacement depends on several factors like weight and activity level. Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team will counsel you about strategies to potentially prolong the lifetime of the device, including avoiding high-impact activities, such as running, as well as maintaining a healthy weight. Talk with Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team about the implant best suited for you.
Every hospital has its own procedures. While you should discuss any specific procedures they may have in place, you may expect to follow this basic routine. Arrive at the hospital at your appointment time and complete the registration and admission process. The nursing team will assess your vital signs (like blood pressure and temperature) and your general health. You’ll change into a hospital gown and likely settle into a pre-surgery room. Your anesthesiologist and operating room nurse will come in to talk with you, and the team will start the IV (intravenous) line that will be used to administer fluids and medication. Your family can usually stay with you until the team wheels to the operating room where Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team will perform your knee replacement. After the surgery, you’ll be wheeled into a recovery room where your recovery team will monitor your vital signs until you’re ready for transport to your hospital room. From there, the hospital floor nursing team will continue to monitor your vital signs and your incision site and dressing. You may be surprised how quickly you’ll be evaluated by a physical therapist. The team will get you moving with special post-op activities. You’ll also begin a diet of clear liquids or soft foods as soon as you can tolerate it.
Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team wants to make sure you’re healthy and prepared for surgery and recovery. You’ll likely need a physical checkup, routine blood work, and a urine test. If you’re over 50, or have a heart or respiratory issue, you may also need an EKG and a chest X-ray. Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team will recommend specific tests based on your specific diagnosis and medical condition.
Not everyone needs blood during knee replacement surgery. If necessary, the hospital provides blood that has been screened in compliance with universal guidelines that help ensure patient safety. In some cases, autologous blood donations, in which a patient donates their own blood to potentially be used during their surgery, can be coordinated. If done, the blood donation must be done several weeks prior to the date of surgery. Speak to Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team about your options.
Most people spend one to four days in the hospital. Depending on your particular surgery and recovery, your team will help decide what’s best for you. Some people go right home. Some go to a rehab center. Some go to a “sub-acute” care center that is a step between the hospital and a rehab center. Talk with your insurance company about the options that are covered by your plan and recommended for you. Typically, Our practice managers, who assists you before, during, and after your surgery, will help you coordinate your recovery care.
Wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing. Most hospitals supply basic toiletries, non-skid socks, and a gown. You’ll want to bring an overnight bag with a few personal toiletries, like shaving supplies, a robe, and anything that will make you feel more comfortable. (Avoid bringing valuables.) And, be sure to bring a list of your current medications and any paperwork the hospital requested. If you use, or plan to use your own assistive device for walking – cane, crutches, or walker – have someone bring it to the hospital before you’re discharged (no need to bring it now).
Generally, hospitals request that you arrive four hours before your scheduled surgery time. This gives you plenty of time for the admission process, to change into your hospital gown, and to meet the anesthesiologist and nursing team who will be with you during your surgery. It also gives you time to ask questions and settle in. Talk to your hospital to see their recommended arrival time. It is typically important for patients not to eat or drink after midnight the night before surgery. But you should ask Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team for instructions about when to stop eating or drinking. Sometimes your physician may allow you to take some of your critical daily medication the morning of surgery. If this is the case, take the medication with the least amount of water necessary. Be sure to tell the admitting nurse if you’ve taken medication.
Typically, Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team or one of the assisting surgeons will come out to the waiting area to talk with your family as soon as you’ve been taken into the recovery room. If your family misses seeing the surgeon, they should contact the surgeon’s office. Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team’s office will arrange a time for your surgeon to discuss your surgery with your family.
It depends on you, your recovery process, and Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team’s recommendation. Most people go home within one to four days after surgery.
Spinal anesthesia is the preferred method for most total knee replacement surgeries. Ask your anesthesiologist about the method recommended for you and any other concerns you have.
Every patient is different and individual surgery times will vary. In general, most patients expect to spend two to three hours in surgery and another two to three hours in the recovery room.
Most people who undergo knee replacement surgery and participate in a physical therapy regimen prescribed by Dr. Chandrasekaran, return to their day-to-day activities like driving in four to six weeks,1 but everyone is different. Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team will help determine a plan best suited for your recovery and your lifestyle.
Most people spend one to four days in the hospital. Depending on your particular surgery and recovery, your team will help decide what’s best for you. Some people go right home. Some go to a rehab center. Some go to a “sub-acute” care center that is a step between the hospital and a rehab center. Talk with your insurance company about the options that are covered by your plan and recommended for you. Typically, Our practice managers, who assists you before, during, and after your surgery, will help you coordinate your recovery care.
It’s recommended that someone assist you full time for the first 48-72 hours after discharge. After that you’ll still need assistance part time for a minimum of one to two weeks. Our practice managers will make arrangements for continued physical therapy either at home or at an outpatient facility. If you live alone or may need extra assistance getting out of bed or standing from a chair (or if you home has lots of stairs and no bathroom on the first floor, for example), Our practice managers may recommend that you spend a few days in a rehab facility. Talk with Our practice managers to decide the best plan for you.
Although everyone is different, you may practice walking up and down stairs in physical therapy before you leave the hospital.1 If Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team allows, you can climb stairs once or twice a day at home during your recovery.
Most people who’ve had knee replacement need a short course of medication to manage their pain. You may only need the medication at night or before physical therapy. Talk with Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team about what to expect.
You’ll likely use a walker or crutches for about six weeks after surgery to help you walk safely and in good form. After that, most patients graduate to using a cane for the next six weeks or so. From then on out, most people who’ve had knee replacements walk well without any support.
Typically, Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team or one of the assisting surgeons will come out to the waiting area to talk with your family as soon as you’ve been taken into the recovery room. If the family misses seeing the surgeon, they should contact the office. Dr. Chandrasekaran’s office will arrange a time for your surgeon to discuss your surgery with your family.
You’ll be wheeled from the recovery area to your hospital room on the orthopaedic surgery floor a few hours after surgery. You may still have an IV for fluids and pain medication. The first night following surgery you may feel groggy from anesthesia and pain medication, but once you’re fully awake, you may be able to eat and drink if allowed by Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team. Your care team will monitor your vital signs, urinary output, and drainage from the incision site. Your leg may be placed on a continuous passive motion (CPM) machine that gently bends and straightens your leg without exertion. You may be surprised that the hospital team will begin getting you out of bed on the first day after surgery. You’ll likely have both physical and occupational therapy to get you moving safely and feel more confident when you move. The physical therapist focuses on weight-bearing techniques when using a walker or crutches, and teaching you exercises that encourage recovery. The occupational therapist will help you manage your day-to-day routine, like dressing, bathing, using the bathroom, and getting in and out of chairs, while you’re recovering.
Doctors make rounds daily to see their patients whenever possible. In addition to Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team and a resident or physician assistant, Our practice managers will meet with you (and family members, if necessary) in order to ensure the most appropriate discharge plan for you. That may mean making arrangements for transfer to a rehabilitation floor or sub-acute floor at the hospital or at another facility.
It depends on you, your recovery process, and Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team’s recommendation. Most people go home within one to four days after surgery.
You may feel overwhelmed for a couple of days. After all, you just had surgery. But once you settle in at home and get a feel for your new knee, you’ll likely begin to feel that you’re turning a corner for the better. If you don’t, and you feel your pain or discomfort is getting worse – or have any concerns at all – call Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team. Our practice managers will check up on you in a minimum of one to two days to ask you a few questions and see how you’re doing. If you have questions or concerns, tell Our practice managers.
It's recommended that someone assist you full time for the first 48-72 hours after discharge. After that you’ll still need assistance part time for a minimum of one to two weeks. If you live alone and friends or family members ask to help, consider taking them up on the offer. The extra support will give you greater peace of mind. Talk with Our practice managers to decide the best plan for you.
The lifetime of a knee replacement is not infinite and varies with each individual. However, with normal wear, knee replacements can potentially last for many years. At the 16-year mark, only 8% of knee replacements required a revision, with implant loosening being the main reason.1 The lifetime of any knee replacement depends on several factors like weight and activity level. Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team will counsel you about strategies to potentially prolong the lifetime of the device, including avoiding high-impact activities, such as running, as well as maintaining a healthy weight. Talk with Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team about the implant best suited for you.
Most people who undergo knee replacement surgery and participate in a physical therapy regimen prescribed Dr. Chandrasekaran, return to their day-to-day activities like driving in four to six weeks,1 but everyone is different. Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team will help determine a plan best suited for your recovery and your lifestyle.
You’ll likely use a walker or crutches for about six weeks after surgery to help you walk safely and in good form. After that, most patients graduate to using a cane for the next six weeks or so. From then on out, most folks who’ve had knee replacements walk well without any support.
You may feel like getting outdoors, but talk with Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team first. Let your safety and comfort be your guide. With someone else driving you, start with short trips, like to outpatient physical therapy appointments or the local supermarket. Increase the length of time you spend outdoors, and the number of trips you take, as you feel more comfortable.
Most people who’ve had a knee replacement are not allowed to drive for six weeks. Depending on which knee was replaced and how you’re recuperating, Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team may have other recommendations.
Everyone’s different, but most people don’t return to work until after their six-week post-op checkup. Talk with Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team for recommendations based on your job duties, your surgery, and your recovery.
In a few weeks Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team may allow you to pick back up with lower-impact activities like hiking, walking, cycling, and golfing.
You may feel overwhelmed for a couple of days. After all, you just had surgery. But once you settle in at home and get a feel for your new knee, you’ll likely begin to feel that you’re turning a corner for the better. If you don’t, and you feel your pain or discomfort is getting worse – or have any concerns at all – call Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team. Our practice managers will check up on you in a minimum of one to two days to ask you a few questions and see how you’re doing. If you have questions or concerns, tell Our practice managers.
It's recommended that someone assist you full time for the first 48-72 hours after discharge. After that you’ll still need assistance part time for a minimum of one to two weeks. If you live alone and friends or family members ask to help, consider taking them up on the offer. The extra support will give you greater peace of mind. Talk with Our practice managers to decide the best plan for you.
Although everyone is different, you may practice walking up and down stairs in physical therapy before you leave the hospital.1 If Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team allows, you can climb stairs once or twice a day at home during your recovery.
Most people who’ve had knee replacement need a short course of medication to manage their pain. You may only need the medication at night or before physical therapy. Talk with Dr. Chandrasekaran’s team about what to expect.

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